Online Courses



Sessions

Counselors’ Mandated Responsibility to Report Child Maltreatment: A Review of U.S. Laws


Identification: JCD18006

Credits: None available.



Source: JCD October 2018

Although counselors in 44 states are mandatory reporters of child maltreatment, they may lack an understanding of their legally designated role. This article presents the results of a systematic review of child maltreatment reporting laws in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The authors apply relevant legislation to real-life contexts for counselors.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the laws and subsequent responsibilities of counselors as mandated reporters in all states and the District of Columbia
  • Understand how state laws vary regarding acts that constitute abuse and neglect; types of reportable abuse; which professionals are labeled as mandatory reporters; and the penalties and liabilities for failure to report

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Resiliency Factors of Trans-College Students: Implications for Professional Counselors and Higher Education Professionals


Identification: LIVA18033

Credits: None available.

This session will examine the resiliency factors and the strategies transgender (trans) college students use to navigate gender-dichotomous collegiate environments. The multiple intersections of college trans* students and their various social identities are highlighted as well as the importance of coping strategies for a successful college experience. One of the presenters identifies as trans* and will share his insights as well as provide first hand suggestions that will inform and assist college counselors, student affairs professionals, faculty, and administrators working with college trans* students. Additional recommendations such as the (un)learning of normative gender constructs, the use of appropriate language in the curricula, and suggestions for providing a safe environment, inside and outside the classroom, will also be explored. Affirmative- and resilience-based counseling and “helping” approaches for working with trans* college students will conclude this training.

Learning Objectives:

  • Awareness and understand the intersection of multiple identities of college trans students.

  • Strategies that trans students use to navigate the campus and the college experience.

  • Begin the process of (un)learning the use of traditional gender constructs.

Speaker(s):
  • Jane E. Rheineck, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education, Northern Illinois University
  • Matthew Lonski, Graduate Student
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Ethical and Legal Considerations: Complicated Issues in Challenging Times


Identification: LIVA18034

Credits: None available.

Over the last decade, conscience objections have surfaced in the public arena, raising questions as to whether counselors may legally refuse services to LGBTQ+ clients due to a counselor’s personally held beliefs. These laws not only deny services to LGBTQ+ clients, but are in direct violation of the ACA Code of Ethics (2014). In addition to values-based referrals, this presentation will address other challenging and complex ethical and legal issues all counselors, particularly those working with LGBTQ+ adults, need to know.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the impact of conscience clause legislation on the counseling profession.
  • Examine the intersection of values and ethics in counseling.
  • Explore values-based conflicts and referrals.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth: Family Acceptance and Emotional Development


Identification: LIVA18036

Credits: None available.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer youth (LGBTQ) experience a variety of struggles when coming out to their families of origin. These struggles include lack of acceptance and support by their families as well as isolation, depression, engagement in risk taking behaviors such as drug and alcohol abuse, and the risk of suicide. The focus of this presentation will be to address prior research on family support and acceptance with LGBTQ youth in their sexual identity development, and possible solutions for counselors to provide assistance with the youth and their families during this adjustment process.

Learning Objectives: 

  • To educate counseling professionals about LGBTQ youth and the impact of disclosure of their sexual and/or gender identity as well as the consequences on the lack of emotional support from caregivers.
  • Benefits to providing support and acceptance to LGBTQ youth, including research evidence and how caregivers can assist in the youth’s coming out process.
  • Treatment approaches and resources to assist LGBTQ youth and their families.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Transgender- Moving from Awareness to Advocacy


Identification: LIVA18035

Credits: None available.

The presentation reviews and summarize the Transgender Population. The definition of Transgender which will include Gender Identity and Gender Queer will be explained. This presentation will also discuss how to best serve the transgender community in a counseling capacity. This will include supporting them psychologically, helping with campus resources, navigating referrals for medical issues, including hormone therapy and possible gender affirming surgery. Participants will be provided examples of how to write a support letter for hormone therapy and gender affirming surgery using the Standards of Care from WPATH. The presentation will finally explain the challenges this population faces especially with the political issues in the media. The expected outcome of this presentation is that participants will acquire an overall increased competency to work with the Transgender population in a counseling setting.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will be able to describe what transgender means and discuss how gender is different from sexual orientation.

  • Participants will describe and use gender inclusive language when working with transgender clients.

  • Participants will be able to utilize different resources to support transgender clients.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Music and Counseling

Jun 13, 2011 12:00am

Identification: ACA113

Credits: None available.

Description:
Music is a universal multicultural experience that can serve as a bridge to the development of new insights and behaviors (J. M. Brown, 2001; Silverman, 2008). It is most simply described as "the appreciation of sound" (Beaulieu, 1987, p. 13). Making music is a creative act as is listening in an active way. Both involve being sensitive and responsive to the cacophony of rhythm that occurs spontaneously in nature and purposely in human interactions (Schneck & Berger, 2006). On its most basic level, music is a nonverbal medium (Vanger, Oerter, Otto, Schmidt, & Czogalik, 1995). It has been used in various ways since the beginning of time to communicate and express feelings (Gfeller, 2002b; Silverman, 2008). Indeed, many civilizations and people have been defined by the types of music they developed, for example, classical music, and the part that music played in their lives. On a global level, some of today's popular music is significant in creating a sense of cultural identity, for example, hip-hop or rap.



Objectives:

  1. Appreciate the role of music as a counseling and therapeutic technique
  2. Examine the various ways in which music can be used in counseling



Source:
The Creative Arts in Counseling, Fourth Edition, by Samuel T. Gladding

Author(s):

The Revised ASERVIC Spiritual Competencies

Jun 13, 2011 12:00am

Identification: ACA114

Credits: None available.

Description:
Competencies are descriptions of what we believe the effective counselor needs to possess to ethically and successfully work with clients on spiritual and religious issues. The 14 competencies in this chapter challenge counselors, as does Guru Nanak, to recognize the essential unity of humankind and humans' common attempts to understand their relationship with the higher power. The competencies are tools to help counselors maintain a relationship with a client even when the client's beliefs are contrary to their own. In essence, the competencies ask counselors to see through the client's lens while being fully conscious of their own spiritual or religious viewpoint. They ask counselors to sacrifice their sectarianism for a while and go beyond mere toleration so that they can truly understand their clients' spiritual and religious lives.



Objectives:

  1. Examine the emergence of the Association for Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC) as a viable entity in the American Counseling Association (ACA)
  2. Identify the specific competencies counselors must possess if they are to effectively address the spiritual and religions needs of their clients



Source:
Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Pracitce, Second Edition, edited by Craig S. Cashwell and J. Scott Young

Author(s):
  • Linda Robertson, Senior Financial Planner, Financial Finesse, Inc.
  • Mark E. Young, PhD, Professor, Counselor Education, University of Central Florida
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Advanced Play Therapy Skills

Jan 9, 2012 12:00am

Identification: ACA127

Credits: None available.

*Counselors requiring New York State approval must contact ACA upon completion to obtain customized CE certificate

Description:
There are several play therapy skills that are applicable to a wide range of different approaches to play therapy. I have chosen to cover metacommunication, therapeutic metaphors, mutual storytelling, and role-playing in this chapter because they can be used across a number of different theoretical orientations and they lend themselves to relatively simple and concrete description. For each of these play therapy skills, I describe the technique, explain the purpose for using that particular technique, provide several examples of how the technique can be used, and set up practice exercises so that the reader can experiment with the application of the skill.



Objectives:

  1. Examine counseling techniques and strategies used in play therapy
  2. Understand how play therapy skills can be used to respond to client needs



Source:
Play Therapy: Basics and Beyond, 2nd edition by Terry Kottman

Author(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $60.00
Members: $40.00

Theoretical Approaches to Play Therapy

Jan 9, 2012 12:00am

Identification: ACA126

Credits: None available.

*Counselors requiring New York State approval must contact ACA upon completion to obtain customized CE certificate

Description:
This chapter provides an overview of Adlerian play therapy, child-centered play therapy, cognitive-behavioral play therapy, ecosystemic play therapy, Gestalt play therapy, Jungian analytical play therapy, psychodynamic play therapy, and Theraplay. Prescriptive play therapy is also very briefly described. For each of the theoretical orientations in this chapter (except prescriptive, which by its very nature requires special treatment), a brief synopsis is provided of the following topics: (a) important theoretical constructs, (b) phases of the counseling process, (c) role of the therapist, (d) goals of therapy, (e) approach to working with parents and teachers, and (f) distinctive features.



Objectives:

  1. Examine the theoretical underpinnings associated with the varied approaches to play therapy.
  2. Relate how broader counseling theories and approaches may be applied in play therapy situations.



Source:
Play Therapy: Basics and Beyond, 2nd edition by Terry Kottman

Author(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $90.00
Members: $60.00

A Harvard Child Psychiatrist Explores Her Own Mother's Suicide

Jan 9, 2012 12:00am

Identification: ACA128

Credits: None available.

Description:
The following questions will be addressed: (1) In Her Wake, the story of your mother's suicide, is a deeply personal one. What motivated you to share it with people outside of your immediate family? (2) You and your mother share the same name and were both writers. What else do you share when it comes to your mother? (3) How has writing In Her Wake changed how you think about your mother? (4) How did you approach your mother's story as both a daughter and as a psychiatrist? (5) How should a reader experiencing symptoms of depression or other types of mental illness approach your book? (6) Has the process of writing In Her Wake changed your approach to therapy and prescribing medications? (7) What did you learn about suicide which directly impacted how you work with patients and families? (8) What is your understanding of the role of impulsivity in suicide and perceived burden of someone who is suicidal? (9) What did you need someone to tell you, or communicate to you, after you found out about your mother's suicide? (10) What has it been like for you to share your story and continue to practice as a child psychiatrist?



Objectives:

  1. Summarize the basic tenets of Dr. Rappaports mother's suicide and how it has changed her as a clinician
  2. Determine the importance of impulsivity in suicide



Source:
Podcast - HT027

Author(s):
Category: Podcast
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00
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