Online Courses



Sessions

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth: Family Acceptance and Emotional Development


Identification: LIVA18036

Credits: None available.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer youth (LGBTQ) experience a variety of struggles when coming out to their families of origin. These struggles include lack of acceptance and support by their families as well as isolation, depression, engagement in risk taking behaviors such as drug and alcohol abuse, and the risk of suicide. The focus of this presentation will be to address prior research on family support and acceptance with LGBTQ youth in their sexual identity development, and possible solutions for counselors to provide assistance with the youth and their families during this adjustment process.

Learning Objectives: 

  • To educate counseling professionals about LGBTQ youth and the impact of disclosure of their sexual and/or gender identity as well as the consequences on the lack of emotional support from caregivers.
  • Benefits to providing support and acceptance to LGBTQ youth, including research evidence and how caregivers can assist in the youth’s coming out process.
  • Treatment approaches and resources to assist LGBTQ youth and their families.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Transgender- Moving from Awareness to Advocacy


Identification: LIVA18035

Credits: None available.

The presentation reviews and summarize the Transgender Population. The definition of Transgender which will include Gender Identity and Gender Queer will be explained. This presentation will also discuss how to best serve the transgender community in a counseling capacity. This will include supporting them psychologically, helping with campus resources, navigating referrals for medical issues, including hormone therapy and possible gender affirming surgery. Participants will be provided examples of how to write a support letter for hormone therapy and gender affirming surgery using the Standards of Care from WPATH. The presentation will finally explain the challenges this population faces especially with the political issues in the media. The expected outcome of this presentation is that participants will acquire an overall increased competency to work with the Transgender population in a counseling setting.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will be able to describe what transgender means and discuss how gender is different from sexual orientation.

  • Participants will describe and use gender inclusive language when working with transgender clients.

  • Participants will be able to utilize different resources to support transgender clients.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Ethical and Legal Considerations: Complicated Issues in Challenging Times


Identification: LIVA18034

Credits: None available.

Over the last decade, conscience objections have surfaced in the public arena, raising questions as to whether counselors may legally refuse services to LGBTQ+ clients due to a counselor’s personally held beliefs. These laws not only deny services to LGBTQ+ clients, but are in direct violation of the ACA Code of Ethics (2014). In addition to values-based referrals, this presentation will address other challenging and complex ethical and legal issues all counselors, particularly those working with LGBTQ+ adults, need to know.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the impact of conscience clause legislation on the counseling profession.
  • Examine the intersection of values and ethics in counseling.
  • Explore values-based conflicts and referrals.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Resiliency Factors of Trans-College Students: Implications for Professional Counselors and Higher Education Professionals


Identification: LIVA18033

Credits: None available.

This session will examine the resiliency factors and the strategies transgender (trans) college students use to navigate gender-dichotomous collegiate environments. The multiple intersections of college trans* students and their various social identities are highlighted as well as the importance of coping strategies for a successful college experience. One of the presenters identifies as trans* and will share his insights as well as provide first hand suggestions that will inform and assist college counselors, student affairs professionals, faculty, and administrators working with college trans* students. Additional recommendations such as the (un)learning of normative gender constructs, the use of appropriate language in the curricula, and suggestions for providing a safe environment, inside and outside the classroom, will also be explored. Affirmative- and resilience-based counseling and “helping” approaches for working with trans* college students will conclude this training.

Learning Objectives:

  • Awareness and understand the intersection of multiple identities of college trans students.

  • Strategies that trans students use to navigate the campus and the college experience.

  • Begin the process of (un)learning the use of traditional gender constructs.

Speaker(s):
  • Jane E. Rheineck, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education, Northern Illinois University
  • Matthew Lonski, Graduate Student
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

A Constructive Approach to Help Counselors Work With Clients Who Express Discriminatory Views

Apr 1, 2019 7:00am ‐ Apr 30, 2019 7:00am

Identification: JCD18007

Credits: None available.

Although much has been written to help counselors understand the potential impact of their own biases toward clients from traditionally marginalized groups, much less attention has been given to assist counselors working with clients who express discriminatory views that counselors may find offensive. In this article, the authors briefly outline how constructive clinical supervision can be integrated with aspects of relational–cultural theory and moral foundations theory to help counselors work with clients who espouse discriminatory views.

  • Review how clinical supervisors can utilize the Constructive Clinical Supervision model to assist counselors working with clients who espouse discriminatory views.
  • Understand how to integrate aspects of Relational-Cultural Theory and Moral Foundations Theory into the Constructive Clinical Supervision model.

Speaker(s):
Members: $22.00
Standard: $32.00

Counselors’ Mandated Responsibility to Report Child Maltreatment: A Review of U.S. Laws


Identification: JCD18006

Credits: None available.



Source: JCD October 2018

Although counselors in 44 states are mandatory reporters of child maltreatment, they may lack an understanding of their legally designated role. This article presents the results of a systematic review of child maltreatment reporting laws in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The authors apply relevant legislation to real-life contexts for counselors.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the laws and subsequent responsibilities of counselors as mandated reporters in all states and the District of Columbia
  • Understand how state laws vary regarding acts that constitute abuse and neglect; types of reportable abuse; which professionals are labeled as mandatory reporters; and the penalties and liabilities for failure to report

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Preliminary Evidence for the Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents

Feb 27, 2018 12:00am

Identification: JCD18004

Credits: None available.

Description:
This meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of DBT for adolescents (DBT-A) in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety, self-injury, and suicide risk. Twelve between-groups studies (N = 834) were chosen that met our inclusion criteria. Results revealed small to medium Hedge’s g effect sizes for all four symptoms compared to control and alternative treatment groups. However, the small number of effect sizes available for each analysis limited the generalizability of our findings. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.



Objectives:

  1. Examine the effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents (DBT-A) in reducing diagnostic symptoms.
  2. Explore advantages and strategies for implementing DBT-A in a variety of settings for youth with significant mental health issues.

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Category: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

The Use of Relational-Cultural Theory in Counseling Clients Who Have Traumatic Stress Disorders

Jan 5, 2018 12:00am

Identification: JCD18003

Credits: None available.

Description:
Counseling scholarship has increasingly demonstrated the utility of relational–cultural theory (RCT) in promoting the relationship building and growth–fostering connections many clients require to manage problems in living. The authors of this article apply RCT to counseling clients who have traumatic stress disorders rooted in traumas of an interpersonal nature (e.g., child abuse, sexual assault, interpersonal partner violence). An overview of traumatic stress disorders and RCT, as well as the ways in which RCT can inform trauma conceptualization and treatment approaches with victims, is here discussed.



Objectives:

  1. Examine how relational-cultural theory (RCT) can be applied when counseling clients who have traumatic stress disorders.
  2. Explore ways in which RCT can inform trauma conceptualization and treatment approaches.

Author(s):
  • Victoria E. Kress, PhD, Professor, Youngstown State University
  • Maria Haiyasoso, Department of Counseling, Leadership, Adult Education, and School Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos
  • Chelsey Zoldan, M.S.Ed, Medication Assisted Treatment Counselor, Meridian Community Care
  • Jessica A. Headley, Teaching Assistant/Adjust Instructor, The University of Akron
  • Heather Trepal, PhD, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at San Antonio
Tags: JCD Article
Category: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Efficacy of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Among Adolescents in a Partial Hospitalization Program

Jan 5, 2018 12:00am

Identification: JCD18002

Credits: None available.

Description:
This study evaluated dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents (DBT-A) versus treatment-as-usual (TAU) within a 6-week partial hospitalization program. The 103 adolescent participants (M age = 15.27 years) were predominately girls (n = 63; 61%) with a variety of primary mental health diagnoses. Results indicated that DBT-A was superior for decreasing symptoms of depression and interpersonal sensitivity, but no statistically significant difference was detected for anxiety or hostility. Implications for treating youth with transdiagnostic identities are discussed.



Objectives:

  1. Explore how dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) can be applied with adolescents in a partial hospitalization program
  2. Examine strategies for treating youth with transdiagnostic identities

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Category: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Meta-Analysis of Anorexia Nervosa Counseling Outcome Studies From 1990 to 2015

Jan 5, 2018 12:00am

Identification: JCD18001

Credits: None available.

Description:
This meta-analysis of 92 anorexia nervosa counseling articles examined effectiveness of counseling in reducing symptoms of anorexia nervosa at termination and longest follow-up assessments. TAU studies showed no to small effects at both posttest and follow-up assessments; waitlist studies showed a small effect at posttest and medium effectiveness at follow-up; and single group uncontrolled studies showed medium to large effects at posttest assessment and medium effects at follow-up. Implications for research and practice were discussed.



Objectives:

  1. Explore the effectiveness of different counseling interventions in reducing symptoms of anorexia nervosa
  2. Synthesize outcome research on counseling as a treatment for adolescents and adults with anorexia nervosa

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Category: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00
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