Online Courses



Sessions

Counselors’ Mandated Responsibility to Report Child Maltreatment: A Review of U.S. Laws


Identification: JCD18006

Credits: None available.



Source: JCD October 2018

Although counselors in 44 states are mandatory reporters of child maltreatment, they may lack an understanding of their legally designated role. This article presents the results of a systematic review of child maltreatment reporting laws in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The authors apply relevant legislation to real-life contexts for counselors.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the laws and subsequent responsibilities of counselors as mandated reporters in all states and the District of Columbia
  • Understand how state laws vary regarding acts that constitute abuse and neglect; types of reportable abuse; which professionals are labeled as mandatory reporters; and the penalties and liabilities for failure to report

Author(s):
Tags: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Resiliency Factors of Trans-College Students: Implications for Professional Counselors and Higher Education Professionals


Identification: LIVA18033

Credits: None available.

This session will examine the resiliency factors and the strategies transgender (trans) college students use to navigate gender-dichotomous collegiate environments. The multiple intersections of college trans* students and their various social identities are highlighted as well as the importance of coping strategies for a successful college experience. One of the presenters identifies as trans* and will share his insights as well as provide first hand suggestions that will inform and assist college counselors, student affairs professionals, faculty, and administrators working with college trans* students. Additional recommendations such as the (un)learning of normative gender constructs, the use of appropriate language in the curricula, and suggestions for providing a safe environment, inside and outside the classroom, will also be explored. Affirmative- and resilience-based counseling and “helping” approaches for working with trans* college students will conclude this training.

Learning Objectives:

  • Awareness and understand the intersection of multiple identities of college trans students.

  • Strategies that trans students use to navigate the campus and the college experience.

  • Begin the process of (un)learning the use of traditional gender constructs.

Speaker(s):
  • Jane E. Rheineck, PhD, Associate Professor in the department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education, Northern Illinois University
  • Matthew Lonski, Graduate Student
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Ethical and Legal Considerations: Complicated Issues in Challenging Times


Identification: LIVA18034

Credits: None available.

Over the last decade, conscience objections have surfaced in the public arena, raising questions as to whether counselors may legally refuse services to LGBTQ+ clients due to a counselor’s personally held beliefs. These laws not only deny services to LGBTQ+ clients, but are in direct violation of the ACA Code of Ethics (2014). In addition to values-based referrals, this presentation will address other challenging and complex ethical and legal issues all counselors, particularly those working with LGBTQ+ adults, need to know.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the impact of conscience clause legislation on the counseling profession.
  • Examine the intersection of values and ethics in counseling.
  • Explore values-based conflicts and referrals.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth: Family Acceptance and Emotional Development


Identification: LIVA18036

Credits: None available.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer youth (LGBTQ) experience a variety of struggles when coming out to their families of origin. These struggles include lack of acceptance and support by their families as well as isolation, depression, engagement in risk taking behaviors such as drug and alcohol abuse, and the risk of suicide. The focus of this presentation will be to address prior research on family support and acceptance with LGBTQ youth in their sexual identity development, and possible solutions for counselors to provide assistance with the youth and their families during this adjustment process.

Learning Objectives: 

  • To educate counseling professionals about LGBTQ youth and the impact of disclosure of their sexual and/or gender identity as well as the consequences on the lack of emotional support from caregivers.
  • Benefits to providing support and acceptance to LGBTQ youth, including research evidence and how caregivers can assist in the youth’s coming out process.
  • Treatment approaches and resources to assist LGBTQ youth and their families.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Transgender- Moving from Awareness to Advocacy


Identification: LIVA18035

Credits: None available.

The presentation reviews and summarize the Transgender Population. The definition of Transgender which will include Gender Identity and Gender Queer will be explained. This presentation will also discuss how to best serve the transgender community in a counseling capacity. This will include supporting them psychologically, helping with campus resources, navigating referrals for medical issues, including hormone therapy and possible gender affirming surgery. Participants will be provided examples of how to write a support letter for hormone therapy and gender affirming surgery using the Standards of Care from WPATH. The presentation will finally explain the challenges this population faces especially with the political issues in the media. The expected outcome of this presentation is that participants will acquire an overall increased competency to work with the Transgender population in a counseling setting.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will be able to describe what transgender means and discuss how gender is different from sexual orientation.

  • Participants will describe and use gender inclusive language when working with transgender clients.

  • Participants will be able to utilize different resources to support transgender clients.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Music and Counseling

Jun 13, 2011 12:00am

Identification: ACA113

Credits: None available.

Description:
Music is a universal multicultural experience that can serve as a bridge to the development of new insights and behaviors (J. M. Brown, 2001; Silverman, 2008). It is most simply described as "the appreciation of sound" (Beaulieu, 1987, p. 13). Making music is a creative act as is listening in an active way. Both involve being sensitive and responsive to the cacophony of rhythm that occurs spontaneously in nature and purposely in human interactions (Schneck & Berger, 2006). On its most basic level, music is a nonverbal medium (Vanger, Oerter, Otto, Schmidt, & Czogalik, 1995). It has been used in various ways since the beginning of time to communicate and express feelings (Gfeller, 2002b; Silverman, 2008). Indeed, many civilizations and people have been defined by the types of music they developed, for example, classical music, and the part that music played in their lives. On a global level, some of today's popular music is significant in creating a sense of cultural identity, for example, hip-hop or rap.



Objectives:

  1. Appreciate the role of music as a counseling and therapeutic technique
  2. Examine the various ways in which music can be used in counseling



Source:
The Creative Arts in Counseling, Fourth Edition, by Samuel T. Gladding

Author(s):

DSM-5 Depressive, Anxiety, and Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders

May 5, 2014 12:00am

Identification: ACA217

Credits: None available.

*Counselors requiring New York State approval must contact ACA upon completion to obtain customized CE certificate

Source:
DSM-5 Learning Companion for Counselors by Stephanie F. Dailey, Carman S. Gill, Shannon L. Karl and Casey A. Barrio Minton



Description:
Discuss the major changes and additions, from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 for depression, anxiety and trauma- and stressor-related disorders and the impact it may have on counselors in recognizing and treating these disorders.



Objectives:

  1. Understand major changes found within the depressive, anxiety and trauma- and stressor-related disorders chapters of the DSM-5
  2. Examine key diagnostic changes, such as the addition of new disorders and changes to coding, recording, and specifiers for depressive, anxiety and trauma- and stressor-related disorders
  3. Reflect upon how these changes and additions may impact counselors, specifically in regards to recognizing and treating depressive, anxiety, and trauma- and stressor-related disorders

Author(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $120.00
Members: $80.00

Enhancing Counselor Supervision Through Compassion Fatigue Education

May 18, 2015 12:00am

Identification: ACA280

Credits: None available.

Description:
Compassion fatigue has been documented as an occupational hazard in counseling. Providing education to interns on compassion fatigue and protective factors, such as self-care, can normalize struggles experienced by interns. Supervision provides a relationship to build skills to help prevent compassion fatigue. Interns should understand counselor developmental phases and the necessity of self-care plans. To instill this knowledge, supervisors should focus on the purpose of supervision, activities of supervision, counselor developmental phases, and compassion fatigue education.



Objectives:

  1. Examine compassion fatigue and how counseling supervisors can educate interns on protective factors
  2. Explore strategies counseling supervisors can use to address compassion fatigue in supervision

Author(s):
Category: JCD Article
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

So, What is Play Therapy and Why Should We Care?

Feb 3, 2016 12:00am

Identification: ACA310

Credits: None available.

*Counselors requiring New York State approval must contact ACA upon completion to obtain customized CE certificate

Source: Partners in Play: An Adlerian Approach to Play Therapy, third edition by Terry Kottman and Kristin Meany-Walen



Description:
Play therapy is usually used as an intervention approach for working with young children who lack the abstract verbal abilities to articulate their difficulties clearly enough to receive support and assistance from counselors. Play therapy seems to work with children experiencing a broad range of difficulties. It can also be used as a modality to help older children, adolescents, and adults who would benefit from a fun, nonthreatening, creative expressive arts form of therapy.



Objectives:

  1. Examine the therapeutic powers of play to help clients prevent or resolve psychosocial difficulties.
  2. Explore the rationale behind play therapy, the types of clients who are appropriate for play therapy, and different approaches used in play therapy.

Author(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Reality Therapy, Choice Theory: What's the Difference?, sixth edition

May 2, 2016 12:00pm

Identification: ACA318

Credits: None available.

Source: Counseling and Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions, Sixth Edition, edited by David Capuzzi and Mark D. Stauffer



Description:
Reality therapy, a practical method based on theory and research, aims to help people take better charge of their lives and fulfill their needs. Choice theory is the theoretical basis for reality therapy and is built on principles that emphasize current motivation for human choices and changes. To help clients make such changes, the counselor focuses on realistic choices, especially those touching on human relationships. The goals of reality therapy are twofold: process goals and outcome goals. The reality therapist helps clients examine their own behavior, evaluate it, and make plans for change. The outcome is more satisfying relationships, increased happiness, and a sense of inner control of their lives.



Objectives:

  1. Distinguish reality therapy from choice theory
  2. Examine major constructs, applications, and efficacy of reality therapy
  3. Explore traditional and current intervention strategies used by reality therapists
  4. Examine ethical and multicultural considerations for counselors using reality therapy

Author(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $60.00
Members: $40.00
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