Free CE of the Month



Sessions

Expanding Perspectives: Systemic Approaches to College Students Experiencing Depression


Identification: JCD19002

Credits: None available.

Family and peer systems significantly influence college students’ mental health. Historically, professional counselors use a variety of treatment models to help clients with mental health concerns. Some interventions focus on the client as an individual, while other interventions include a “systems approach.” The authors of this article discuss research on systems-based treatment models when assisting U.S. college students with mental health concerns, such as depression.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the prevalence of mental health concerns among college students in the United States
  • Name one frequently reported mental health concerns among U.S. college students
  • Identify systems that may support and detract from positive therapeutic outcomes for college students who are engaged in counseling

Speaker(s):
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Ten Ways to Intentionally Use Group Work to Transform Hate and Enhance Community Building


Identification: LIVA19011

Credits: None available.

The Association for Specialists in Group Work recently created a best-practice document that provides 10 ways that group work can be used to transform hate, facilitate courageous conversations, and enhance community building. Come and meet the authors of this document, who will discuss group work strategies for creating brave, affirming, and humanizing spaces; cultivating cultural humility; engaging in intentional unity building, and much more. Key resources, videos, training tools, and websites will also be shared.

Speaker(s):
  • Lorraine Joyce Guth, PhD, Professor, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • Ana Isabel Puig, PhD, Scholar & Research Director and Affiliate Faculty, University of Florida
  • Christian D. Chan, PhD, Assistant Professor of Counseling, Idaho State University
  • Anneliese A. Singh, PhD, Professor and Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, The University of Georgia
  • Hopeton A. Bailey, Graduate Assistant and Graduate Student, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Ethical Issues Related to the Practice of Online Clinical Supervision


Identification: WEBA19001

Credits: None available.

Ethical Issues Related to the Practice of Online Clinical Supervision

Learning objectives:

  • Name one advanced technology used to facilitate the intervention of clinical supervision.
  • Differentiate the concept of ethics from laws, particularly when discussing the use of technology in clinical supervision.
  • Name two overarching responsibilities for counseling supervisors when using technology in clinical supervision.
  • Review and become more familiar with sections from the 2014 ACA Code of Ethics which related to Technology-Assisted Distance Supervision.


Still have questions after the webinar? ACA members seeking licensure can find a supervisor and receive a discount on their first three sessions of supervision. Get started with Motivo here.

Speaker(s):
Tags: ethics

Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for Substance Misuse


Identification: LIVA18020

Credits: None available.

This session will provide attendees with the knowledge and skills needed to implement SBIRT in their counseling practice setting. After learning about the public health approach to high-risk substance use and developing basic motivational interviewing skills, attendees will learn how to screen an individual for high-risk substance use, provide a brief intervention by highlighting the current risks and opportunities for change, and refer individuals who may have a substance use disorder for treatment.


Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the public health model as it applies to high-risk substance use
  • Identify and use screening tools to determine the level of risk associated with alcohol and/or other drug use
  • Develop and practice basic motivational interviewing skills that support the implementation of SBIRT.

Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

A Constructive Approach to Help Counselors Work With Clients Who Express Discriminatory Views


Identification: JCD18007

Credits: None available.

Although much has been written to help counselors understand the potential impact of their own biases toward clients from traditionally marginalized groups, much less attention has been given to assist counselors working with clients who express discriminatory views that counselors may find offensive. In this article, the authors briefly outline how constructive clinical supervision can be integrated with aspects of relational–cultural theory and moral foundations theory to help counselors work with clients who espouse discriminatory views.

  • Review how clinical supervisors can utilize the Constructive Clinical Supervision model to assist counselors working with clients who espouse discriminatory views.
  • Understand how to integrate aspects of Relational-Cultural Theory and Moral Foundations Theory into the Constructive Clinical Supervision model.

Speaker(s):
Members: $22.00
Standard: $32.00

Developing Competence in Working With LBGTQI+ Communities: Awareness, Knowledge, Skills, and Action


Identification: BK18003

Credits: None available.

The chapter will assist counselors and other mental health professionals in gaining competence in working with LGBTQI+ clients.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Examine standards and competencies counselors can use to develop competence in working with LGBTQI+ individuals.
  2. Explore concepts of power and privilege, oppression and bias, career and health disparities, and overarching cultural biases regarding affectional orientation and gender variance.

Speaker(s):
  • Misty M. Ginicola, PhD, Professor/ Counselor, Southern CT State University/ Self-Employed
  • Joel M. Filmore, EdD, Assistant Professor, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
  • Cheri Smith, PhD, Professor, Southern Connecticut State University
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

SpiritSpirit

Preview Available

Spirit


Identification: BK19001

Credits: None available.

This chapter addresses the internal lives of clients and the role of faith and meaning in wellness. Spirituality, values, ethics, and morals are delineated as they relate to meaning making and the role of self as it affects others. Spirit wellness is conceptualized as the process of feeling connected to, and searching for, meaning, purpose, and awe-inspired relationships with self, others, and the world around us.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore ways in which counselors can better understand the internal lives of clients and the role of faith and meaning in wellness.
  • Examine spirituality, values, ethics, and morals and how these factors relate to meaning making in client’s lives.
  • Understand practical applications of exploring faith, meaning, purpose, and spiritual development with clients.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Dirt Road Counseling: Evidence-Based Interventions for Rural Mental Health Delivery


Identification: LIVA18016

Credits: None available.

National datasets show a severe shortage of mental health providers in rural communities. The presenters will discuss current trends in the delivery of counseling and other mental health services to rural clients and communities. Current literature suggests the needs of rural clients are as diverse as those faced by clients from the inner city. This session will help counselors to connect with the most current and up- to-date practices for the delivery of evidenced-based mental health services for clients in rural areas.

Learning Objectivies:

  • Identify models for delivery of mental health services in rural areas and critically examine current literature on rural mental health.
  • Explore challenges faced by clients and providers within rural populations and develop stronger working relationships with rural mental health providers.
  • Understand diversity issues and multicultural needs of mental health clients in rural areas and generalize findings to better mental health service delivery in other rural areas.

Speaker(s):
  • Charles Crews, PhD, Associate Professor for the Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership, Texas Tech University
  • Tara Fox, MA, Behavioral Health Specialist, Central Plains Center
  • Katye Clark, MEd, Counselor, West Texas Centers
Standard: $49.00
Members: $29.00

Animal-Assisted Therapy in Counseling, Therapeutic Horticulture, and Wilderness/Nature Therapy


Identification: BK18001

Credits: None available.


This chapter explores the multidimensional premises behind the power of animals, plants, and nature in life as well as the practical use of animals, plants, and nature in counseling.

Tags: Book Chapter
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00

Internet Addiction


Identification: ACA277

Credits: None available.

Source: 

Watson, J. C. (2015). Internet addiction. In R. L. Smith (Ed.), Treatment strategies for substance and process addictions (pp. 293–312). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association



Description:
This chapter examines the emerging construct of Internet addiction, how it is conceptualized in the current diagnostic nomenclature, and how it can be addressed and processed in the counseling relationship.



Objectives:

  1. Explore various techniques and instruments that can be used to assess for Internet addiction
  2. Understand evidence-based practices for addressing and treating Internet addiction across various clinical settings

Speaker(s):
Category: Book Chapter
Standard: $32.00
Members: $22.00
Print Certificate
Review Answers
Print Transcript
Completed on: token-completed_on
Review Answers
Please select the appropriate credit type:
/
test_id: 
credits: 
completed on: 
rendered in: 
* - Indicates answer is required.
token-content
token-speaker-name image
token-speaker-name
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
/
/
token-index
token-content